Business owners say extreme heat in New Jersey can be both good and bad for the bottom line

New Jersey is in the middle of a heat wave. Some business owners around the state thrive when temperatures get this warm, but other business owners say that they hope the heat won’t cause their profits to drop.

News 12 Staff

Jul 21, 2022, 9:57 PM

Updated 705 days ago

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New Jersey is in the middle of a heat wave. Some business owners around the state thrive when temperatures get this warm, but other business owners say that they hope the heat won’t cause their profits to drop.
It is no surprise that a business like an ice cream shop does very well when the warm temperatures arrive. The Mortimer family kept cool on Thursday by getting lunch at the Cranford Vanilla Bean Creamery.
“It’s just so hot everywhere. I thought, ‘We’ll just have ice cream for lunch today,’” says mom Erin Mortimer.
“The more ice cream we sell, the longer hours I work,” says shop owner Ralph Kopelman.
He says that the warmer weather brings on the profits.
A few miles away at Dreyer Farms, the sprinklers are working overtime. The agriculture industry is dealing not only with extreme heat but also drought conditions. It is making it harder to produce “Jersey Fresh” products.
“A couple days ago, we had one good rain, but it was the first rain in weeks…Things dry out very quickly in the field,” says owner Brett Dreyer.
Most New Jersey farmers say that they are prepared for all extreme weather. Irrigation systems in the fields get water directly to the roots where it is needed the most. Overhead sprinkler systems – and the employees on the ground – take care of any potted crops or crops in the nursery. Cooling systems in the shop keep produce and other food products safe and fresh for customers.
“Weather is a big part of farming…It’s not ideal, but we feel pretty prepared – at least for the time being. We need rain. Can’t go forever without rain, but for short-term, we feel we will be OK,” Dreyer says.
The farmers say that the plants deal with the heat better than people. Dreyer says he is more concerned with his employees. He keeps them in the shade as much as possible and tells them to stay hydrated and take breaks when needed.


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