‘Kilt the Virus’: Hospital personnel in Somerset County invited to wear a kilt to work to boost morale

Some medical heroes in Somerset County reduced stress back in the spring by wearing yoga pants to work, known as "Pants the Virus", but now – the movement has become “Kilt the Virus.”

News 12 Staff

Nov 24, 2020, 4:12 PM

Updated 1,299 days ago

Share:

Some medical heroes in Somerset County reduced stress back in the spring by wearing yoga pants to work, known as "Pants the Virus", but now – the movement has become “Kilt the Virus.”
Dr. Marc Milano, chief of the emergency room at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset, has once again come up with an idea to not just reduce the stress for doctors and nurses dealing with an ever-increasing number of coronavirus cases, but to help boost morale during these difficult times. 
“Now, with things starting to heat up again a little bit, we decided it was time to get ahead of it and do something that would get people’s morale back up again, so that's where the Kilt the Virus movement came from,” says Dr. Milano.
Dr. Milano is inviting all hospital personnel to take part by wearing a kilt to work. Back in the spring, after dozens of yoga pants were delivered as a gift to the hospital, he and other emergency room workers began wearing them on a daily basis. 
“When we started back in February and March, everybody’s tank was full,” says Dr. Milano. “Everybody was literally on F and as the pandemic went on their tanks kind of drained. So, the idea is right now knowing everybody doesn’t have a completely full tank to do things to get them back up again.” 
It’s also nice to have some help along the way. 
“Luckily for me, I have a neighbor Kevin, who is a Scotsman born and raised there,” says Dr. Milano. “He wears kilts to weddings and special events and things like that and I saw him walking out to his car with one on and I said, ‘hey, can I borrow a few?’”
The move certainly helped lower the stress level and kept morale up when it seemed coronavirus was getting the best of everyone. It's hoped the "Kilt the Virus" movement will do the same this time around. 
One of the biggest differences about the first wave and this wave is how hospitals are dealing with those who need non-coronavirus care. Dr. Milano says this time around if you need attention, don't hesitate to visit your doctor or hospital. They learned a lot from the first wave and feel much better equipped to handle non-COVID-19 patients this time. 


More from News 12