Back-to-school: Heavy backpacks and hunching over while taking notes. We speak to experts on alleviating stress.

Heavy backpacks and hunching over while taking notes -- remember those school days? News 12 went to the experts to see how students can alleviate some of the stress on their bodies.

News 12 Staff

Aug 30, 2022, 10:39 AM

Updated 597 days ago

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Heavy backpacks and hunching over while taking notes -- remember those school days? News 12 went to the experts to see how students can alleviate some of the stress on their bodies.
“I mean you're carrying books that are 10 pounds,” says Adam Anton, with Stretchlab in Marlboro. “I was that kid that used to not go to my locker and have five books in my bag.”
Anton remembers those days, and now -- he's a flexologist helping others. So besides taking a few books out of the backpack, he has a few suggestions.
“Kids before they sit down and start their day and sit at their desks, give a nice stretch back,” says Anton. “As they get loosen, start their day and sit at their desks. Now that hey I don't feel all that stress and my shoulders coming forward. I'm going to sit back, have good posture – and if you're typing try to stay up more if your keyboard. So, as you're typing try to keep the chest up, shoulders back, elbows to your side. Rather than coming down one finger at a time and getting close to that screen. When you're writing the tendency is to really get that elbow out and try to cover the paper, so people don't cheat. Keep your elbow close to your side and really concentrate. Even when you're writing try to keep good form because carpal tunnel if we start to slouch our wrist in weird positions.”
Here are a couple of stretches: Cross your leg on top and gently push down. Try leaning forward if you can. For better posture, put your arms in the T and lean to each side. Go around the clock with your neck. Cross your legs and touch your toes.
Flexoligists at StretchLab in Marlboro say if you don't focus on good posture early, you'll need lots of correction as you get older.
“If you wanna feel better both inside and outside. The more you stretch, you're going to be starting your day in a better frame of mind,” says Anton. “Honestly reducing bad posture, it's going to make you feel taller and stand up in the clouds. And it's going to make you smile.”
According to a study, kids sit on average 8.5 hours per day. The study suggests breaking up the time kids are sitting down can be good for attention but also short term and possibly long term health.


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