‘Something is going to happen’: Boat captain says he warned Coast Guard that capsizing incident was inevitable

The Coast Guard is now leading the investigation into how a boat capsized on the Hudson River -- leading to the death of two people -- but a boat captain who works on the river every day believes the boat involved was simply overloaded with passengers.

News 12 Staff

Jul 14, 2022, 10:39 AM

Updated 711 days ago

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The Coast Guard is now leading the investigation into how a boat capsized on the Hudson River -- leading to the death of two people -- but a boat captain who works on the river every day believes the boat involved was simply overloaded with passengers.
Capt. Paul Dauriac spoke with News 12 New Jersey's Chris Keating, telling him, he warned the Coast Guard several years ago that an accident just like this could happen if certain operators went unchecked. 
The accident brings about the question as to whether or not there were too many people on board. Dauriac says he's been very vocal with the Coast Guard for five years about what is going on in New York Harbor, calling traffic on the river the Wild West -- lot of boats, no speed limit and strong current.
In this case, a 24-foot boat with 12 people on board capsizing on the river was, in his words -- inevitable.
Lindelia Vasquez, 47, and Julian Vasquez, 7, became trapped under the boat and did not survive. 
"We see them, you've got 10 people on a boat that's 26-feet long. It defies logic,” says Dauriac. “I sent the Coast Guard an email five weeks ago telling them you've got a 26-foot boat out, there's 30 knot winds, something is going to happen."
Dauriac owns and operates four charter boats for his company, SailAwayNewYork.com. He says there are too many of the smaller so-called bare-boat charters that are operating unchecked by the Coast Guard on the Hudson River.
Coincidentally, the Coast Guard put out a release on boating safety, in which it said, “Overloading can cause the boat to ride lower in the water, reduce the vessel's stability and greatly increase the chance of capsizing.”
The release suggested that people “be on the lookout for illegal charters. If the vessel is carrying six or more passengers, it must have a valid Coast Guard Certificate of Inspection."
The Coast Guard has not yet named the charter, or the captain, involved in the crash.


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