New York’s congestion pricing plan moves forward despite opposition from NJ officials

At a public meeting in Manhattan on Thursday, officials discussed how much more they will charge drivers when congestion pricing is implemented - but they haven’t yet set the rate.

Matt Trapani

Aug 18, 2023, 10:47 PM

Updated 311 days ago

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New York’s congestion pricing plan to charge New Jersey drivers entering Manhattan is still moving forward, despite resistance from Garden State officials.
At a public meeting in Manhattan on Thursday, officials discussed how much more they will charge drivers when congestion pricing is implemented - but they haven’t yet set the rate.
The Traffic Mobility Review Board will ultimately advise the Metropolitan Transportation Authority on who might get an exemption. The board said it received hundreds of requests for exemptions and 55 requests by others saying someone else shouldn’t be exempted.
Other items still undecided include if taxis and government vehicles will get a pass or if buses will be charged only once. It was also not known what time of day congestion pricing will be in effect. Data shows that it takes until around 9 p.m. for traffic to go back to pre-6 a.m. levels.
“What time periods should the standard rate apply, what time periods should the overnight rate apply? Would it be helpful to have a third time period, somewhere in between the standard night that could be used to smooth out traffic, to prevent a rush of drivers just before the overnight rate ends and the standard rate begins?” asked Julietta Michaelson, special adviser for the Traffic Mobility Review Board.
The board is not likely to give New Jersey drivers a pass, though there is a possibility of a credit applied retroactively.
Gov. Phil Murphy announced he has filed a lawsuit against New York and the MTA to prevent congestion pricing from going forward.


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