Groups gather to honor soldiers from US historical wars laid to rest at Whippany cemetery

Groups gathered in Whippany Fourth of July Sunday at a cemetery where soldiers dating as far back as before the Revolutionary War were laid to rest.

News 12 Staff

Jul 4, 2021, 1:14 PM

Updated 1,016 days ago

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Groups gathered in Whippany Fourth of July Sunday at a cemetery where soldiers dating as far back as before the Revolutionary War were laid to rest.
The Whippany Burying Yard on Route 10 is a cemetery that was established in 1718, over a half a century before the United States officially gained Independence from Great Britain. It's one of the oldest graveyards in New Jersey.
Resting at the cemetery are first settlers, ancestors of presidents and others who fought in the French and Indian, Revolutionary and Civil wars.
"We have here men and women who literally wrote the laws and created the country," said Michael J. Czuchnicki, of the Hanover Township Landmark Commission.
Costumed guides playing the role of some of the deceased provided guided tours of the graveyard to the public -- free of charge.
Randolph High School student Giovanni Ricupero played the role of Revolutionary War Veteran Uzel Kitchell, who died in 1813.
Ricupero said it's important to remember and honor those who laid their lives for this nation's freedoms.
"Let's not forget about why we're here and why we are celebrating and why we're having these barbecues or we are going down to the beach. It's nice to celebrate and everything but let's just bring it back to why we were celebrating and also have some fun," Ricupero said.
Pinebrook President Matt Ursbruch brought his boys to the graveyard for the guided tours as a history lesson on the holiday.
"I think it's a really important thing for us and especially for these guys to learn why we are here and why we are able to live the way we do," Ursbruch said.
The home adjacent to the graveyard was recently donated to the community a future site of a museum to carry on the legacy of those buried at the cemetery and their contributions to our country.
The guided tours ended at noon, but if you're interested, you can stop by anytime during daylight hours to take part in a self-guided tour with maps available at the entrance.


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