Family blames long-term care facility, state for mother’s COVID-19 death

A New Jersey woman says that the state and a long-term care facility failed to protect her mother who ended up dying from COVID-19.

News 12 Staff

Apr 24, 2020, 2:09 AM

Updated 1,460 days ago

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A New Jersey woman says that the state and a long-term care facility failed to protect her mother who ended up dying from COVID-19.
Georgette Eiserle died on Easter Sunday at the Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center. Forty-one people living at the facility have died from the virus to date.
Daughter Desiree Stygar says that she and her mother did not know there were cases of the virus at the facility until Eiserle died.
“We trusted the facility, the workers and the state of New Jersey to look out for them,” Stygar says.
Stygar says that the state failed to keep her 75-year-old mother alive. Eiserle has been living at the facility with COPD – a chronic lung disease.
Eiserle’s daughter says that despite cases of COVID-19 in the facility, Eiserle was never tested. The family has since learned from Eiserle’s own nurse’s aide died from COVID-19 – but even that did not lead to a test.
Stygar says that she called her mother on Easter Sunday, but did not get an answer. She says that she then called the Andover front desk and was told 10 minutes later that her mother had passed.
“I get a phone call stating that, ‘We are so sorry. Your mom stopped breathing,” Stygar says.
Stygar says that as the largest nursing home in New Jersey the state health commissioner should've had help in Andover earlier.
“There should’ve been a task force monitoring that facility due to its size, plus it had prior violations,” Stygar says.
She says that she was told that the virus was brought in by the workers. She says that aides and housekeepers did not have proper PPE.
New Jersey Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli says Medicaid and Medicare surveyors are in the building.
"They will be doing a full survey of Andover in relation to what we consider immediate jeopardy complaints,” Persichilli says.
The state attorney general is investigating, no new residents are allowed and the facility must hire an infection control manager.
Stygar says that she found out there were COVID-19 cases through a letter, but says that she should have been called. She says that if she had known earlier she would've pulled her mother from the facility, and perhaps she would still be alive.
 


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