New law cracks down on tethering pets outside

A new state law is putting rules into place for how and when pets can be kept outside.
The law makes it illegal to “cruelly restrain a dog,” especially in extreme weather.
West Monmouth Animal Control officer Sharon Gaboff says that she often gets calls about dogs tied up outside in extremely hot or cold weather.
“[The owners] do get warnings. We do give them education, tell them how unfair it is and how cruel it is,” she says. “They’re shocked that they’re not supposed to leave their dog outside.”
The new law now states that pets must have access to shelter warmer than 32 degrees and cooler than 90 degrees if they are tethered to a fence or pole. That shelter must also be well-ventilated.
Pets also cannot be tethered to a leash that is less than 15 feet long, and they cannot be restrained while wearing a choker or prong collar.
Dogs that are nursing puppies or dogs less than 4 months old cannot be left tethered at all.
“I hope it goes nationwide and I hope they have more laws to protect these animals that can’t speak for themselves,” Gaboff says.
The law also requires pet owners to make every effort to evacuate their pets with them in the event of a weather emergency. If a pet can't be with its owner, it should be brought to a kennel or a protective indoor area that's safe from flooding.