Rep. Pallone: $2.86 billion in bill would fund 9/11-related illnesses treatment program

As the nation prepares to commemorate 20 years since the Sept. 11 attacks, Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. is pushing to include essential funding for those suffering from medical illnesses related to 9/11.

News 12 Staff

Sep 9, 2021, 11:27 PM

Updated 951 days ago

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As the nation prepares to commemorate 20 years since the Sept. 11 attacks, Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. is pushing to include essential funding for those suffering from medical illnesses related to 9/11.
The James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 was signed into law in 2011. It helped establish the World Trade Center Program clinic at Rutgers' Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute in Piscataway where many 9/11 first responders and survivors have been treated.
"People find themselves getting these diseases that really, without the research that goes on at these centers, they might not even know what they are or how to treat them," Pallone said.
Pallone announced Thursday that he's including $2.86 billion for the 9/11 World Trade Center Health Program in the Energy and Commerce Committee's portion of the Build Back Better Act
"We're putting in this infrastructure jobs bill that we expect to pass by the end of September," Pallone said. "In other words, this is a must pass bill that is moving quickly and so there's an opportunity to put this money in there, I'm going to try to take that opportunity."
The program provides no-cost medical monitoring and treatment for those suffering from 9/11-related health conditions.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the program is in danger of running out of funding by 2025.
"It was meant to be permanent, but now we know the funding is somewhat inadequate and by 2025 there will begin to be shortfalls," Pallone said.
"We want everybody to be able to participate in the program to the fullest," Pallone said. "We want to make sure that they continue to get adequate treatment and that they continue to have the research to know what kind of treatment to give them."
The overall bill is expected to pass strictly with Democratic votes. However, the portion of the bill regarding funding for the World Trade Center Health Program is a bipartisan issue said Pallone.
The Energy and Commerce Committee will be marking up the bill next week before it goes to the House floor. It's expected to pass in the Senate.


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