HEAT ALERT

Excessive heat watch issued for parts of New Jersey with sizzling temperatures

'Princess Doe' identified 40 years after remains were found in Blairstown cemetery

A teenage girl who was dubbed “Princess Doe” after her remains were found 40 years ago in a Warren County cemetery has been identified as a Long Island teenager, authorities announced Friday.

News 12 Staff

Jul 15, 2022, 4:12 PM

Updated 705 days ago

Share:

A teenage girl who was dubbed “Princess Doe” after her remains were found 40 years ago in a Warren County cemetery has been identified as a Long Island teenager, authorities announced Friday.
“Without science and technology, Princess Doe would have never been identified,” says Warren County Prosecutor James Pfeiffer.
The teen was identified as 17-year-old Dawn Olanick, of West Babylon, New York. DNA also helped to identify her alleged killer, 68-year-old Arthur Kinlaw, who is also from Long Island. Police say Kinlaw admitted to the murder in 2005.
“Mr. Kinlaw had written numerous letters to our office indicating that he was responsible,” Pfeiffer says.
Kinlaw sent those letters from prison. Ha has been serving a 20-years-to-life sentence since 2000 for another murder.
Authorities say Kinlaw tried to bring Olanick into the world of prostitution.
“She was unwilling to do that and as a result, we believe that led to Mr. Kinlaw murdering Dawn,” Pfeiffer says.
Olanick’s remains were found July 25, 1982 in Cedar Ridge Cemetery in Blairstown. Authorities have said she was beaten beyond recognition.
Officials say that Kinlaw had no connection to Blairstown, it was just a place to dispose of the body. The Blairstown community took in Olanick as one of their own. Residents of the area gave her a burial, and she became known as Princess Doe, a name given to her by investigators who sought to identify her. Her burial site contains a gravestone that reads: “Princess Doe. Missing from home. Dead among strangers. Remembered by all.”
Family members at a news conference on Friday said that they are forever grateful.
“My cousin is right here. It touches my heart. It’s how I’ll remember her,” one family member said.
“It was with somewhat of a broken heart that I heard this news, knowing that this community had adopted Dawn. Never forgot her,” says New Jersey State Police Superintendent Col. Patrick Callahan.
The Olanick family says they will have a new marker placed on Olanick’s grave with her proper name inscribed on it.
The Associated Press wire services contributed to this report.


More from News 12