New Jersey could see dangerously warm temperatures. Here’s how to stay safe

Storm Watch Team meteorologists are predicting that Wednesday could see daytime highs around 96 degrees. Thursday could see highs around 94.

News 12 Staff

Jul 12, 2023, 2:24 AM

Updated 338 days ago

Share:

New Jersey could see a heat wave this week – temperatures reaching 90 degrees or above for at least three days in a row.
Many health risks come along with temperatures this high. Medical experts tell News 12 New Jersey that this is especially true for children, the elderly and those with chronic illnesses.
Storm Watch Team meteorologists are predicting that Wednesday could see daytime highs around 96 degrees. Thursday could see highs around 94.
People who are without fans or air conditioning in their homes are advised to go to cooling centers that are stationed around the state.
“The temperatures can affect the ways our heart pumps blood. At that moment we will start having more sweat. We will notice the redness of our skin and also have headaches,” says Dr. Ilan Shapiro. “After that, our body can’t stop adjusting to the temperature. And after that, our hearts, lungs and brains can start having trouble functioning.”
Cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke are all heat-related illnesses. Symptoms with each vary from painful cramps to vomiting, confusion and fever. A heat stroke can also lead to death.
“At that moment we will need medical attention to make sure our temperature gets regulated and also if needed, hydration,” Shapiro says.
Newark resident Nuk Williams says she couldn’t handle the heat in her home Tuesday afternoon.
“In my house we just have fans,” she says. “It is really hot and I’m about to get in this pool.”
According to the National Weather Service, there are more extreme heat-related deaths in inner cities because of poor access to air-conditioned rooms. 
This is the reason why cooling centers, like the one in Elizabeth, are life savers. There is even a water park outside this one location.
“Some residents can’t afford the air conditioning. Don’t have the money to buy fans,” says Larry Graham, director of recreation for the city of Elizabeth. “You can get 150 people inside.”
Health experts say that when it gets this hot, people should drink plenty of water, wear light and loose clothing and limit their time spent outdoors.
The New Jersey Department of Health says that at least 181 people died of heat stroke in New Jersey between 2000 and 2020.


More from News 12