I-Team Investigates - Q-Ray bracelet claims

(08/08/06) EDISON ? Commercials for the Q-Ray ionized bracelet feature customers touting the re-vitalizing properties of the product, but health and consumer experts in New Jersey have serious questions.

The bracelet is supposed to use ancient health techniques to work with a person?s body naturally. The company?s television spots show customers discussing their increased energy and vitality. However, Dr. Stephen Barrett of Quackwatch.com claims the Q-Ray has absolutely no medical value. Barrett goes so far as to call the bracelet a ?quack device.?

Representatives of the Mayo Clinic also have their doubts. In a study of 600 patients, doctors at the clinic say they found no medical benefits. Members of the medical community aren?t the only people criticizing Q-Ray. In 2003, the Federal Trade Commission levied false advertising charges against the bracelet?s maker over claims the product could relieve pain. The company has since dropped claims about pain relief from its commercials.

In response to the criticism, Q-Ray representatives say alternative medical techniques are difficult to prove. They also claim more than a million people use the bracelets, including pro golfer Sandra Post and Olympian Sanya Richards.

Related information: I-Team Investigates

 

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