Students learn how to save plants from deer

The large deer population in New Jersey is forcing plants and animals that are native to the Garden State to disappear.

A new program is teaching New Jersey students how to change what conservationists call Empty Forest Syndrome. Students from New Jersey's urban areas are working with conservation groups at Apshawa Preserve in West Milford.

Conservationists say the large population of deer has made it so there is almost no regeneration of trees, shrubs or wildflowers.

An area has been fenced in to preserve the plants and deer are forced out to allow vegetation to grow. Three-hundred acres of land was fenced off to preserve forest space, but students are not stopping there.

Their six-week conservation program also teaches them how to build safer hiking trails, so forests can be explored more easily.

sorry to interrupt
your first 20 are free
Access to News 12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Time Warner® and Service ElectricSM customers.
Please enjoy 20 complimentary views of articles, photos, and videos during the next 30 days.
you have reached your 5 view limit
Access to News 12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Time Warner® and Service ElectricSM customers.
Please login, create an account or subscribe to continue enjoying News12.
Our sign-up page is undergoing maintenance and is not currently available. However, you will be given direct access to news12.com while we complete our upgrade.
When we are back up and running you will be prompted at that time to complete your sign in. Until then, enjoy the local news, weather, traffic and more that's "as local as local news gets."