Study: Cancer not among diseases from Ground Zero

A Ground Zero cancer study has ignited frustration and anger among first responders from New Jersey. The just-released federal review found very little evidence linking cancer to the toxic cloud created when the Twin Towers fell on Sept. 11.

News 12 New Jersey spoke with two Ocean County first responders who are upset by the study. Charles Giles, a former New York City EMT, and Richard Skinner, a former New York City firefighter, blame their failing health on the toxins that filled the air and their lungs as they worked at Ground Zero.

The first responders spent days searching the rubble for survivors followed by months toiling on the pile, inhaling air they were assured was safe to breathe.

The results mean cancer will not be added to the list of 9/11 health problems eligible for treatment under the Zadroga health care bill. It's a list that already includes asthma, mental illness, and post-traumatic stress disorder, among others.

sorry to interrupt
your first 20 are free
Access to News 12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Time Warner® and Service ElectricSM customers.
Please enjoy 20 complimentary views of articles, photos, and videos during the next 30 days.
you have reached your 5 view limit
Access to News 12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Time Warner® and Service ElectricSM customers.
Please login, create an account or subscribe to continue enjoying News12.
Our sign-up page is undergoing maintenance and is not currently available. However, you will be given direct access to news12.com while we complete our upgrade.
When we are back up and running you will be prompted at that time to complete your sign in. Until then, enjoy the local news, weather, traffic and more that's "as local as local news gets."