US agency: Samsung Galaxy Note 7 too dangerous to use

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says owners of the Galaxy Note 7 smartphones should turn them off and stop using them because of the

FILE - In this July 28, 2016, file photo, a screen magnification feature of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 is demonstrated, in New York. Aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. The Federal Aviation Administration issued the warning Sept. 8, citing

FILE - In this July 28, 2016, file photo, a screen magnification feature of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 is demonstrated, in New York. Aviation safety officials took the extraordinary step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge a new model Samsung smartphone during flights following numerous reports of the devices catching fire. The Federal Aviation Administration issued the warning Sept. 8, citing "recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung about its Galaxy Note 7 devices." It is extremely unusual for the FAA to warn passengers about a specific product. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File) (9/9/16)

EDISON - The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says owners of the Galaxy Note 7 smartphones should turn them off and stop using them because of the risk that their batteries can explode.

The agency said Friday that it's working with Samsung on an official recall of the phones "as soon as possible" and that it's trying to figure out if the company's replacement Note 7s are an "acceptable remedy."

Samsung last week began a global recall for the phone, just two weeks after its launch, because of the risk of them catching fire or exploding. At the time, Samsung said it had confirmed 35 instances of the problem, out of 2.5 million phones sold. The company did not say last week whether users should stop using the phones, and said new phones would be available in about two weeks.

But in a statement Friday, Samsung Electronics America asked Note 7 owners to shut off their phones and exchange them now for another device. The company says new Note 7 phones will not be available until after the CPSC finishes its "process," but owners can exchange the Note 7s now for a different model.

U.S. aviation safety officials also on Thursday took the unusual step of warning airline passengers not to turn on or charge the phone during flights, or put them in checked bags.

The recall comes at a crucial time for Samsung, as its rival Apple just announced its own latest versions of the iPhone. The Note series is one of Samsung's most expensive, and demand for the phone had been high.

More on this topic

Statement from U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Read more

advertisement | advertise on News 12

Trending Video

Police in Asbury Park calling for cease fire 1 Police in Asbury Park call for cease-fire after shootings
Police worked with the prosecutor's office to conduct 2 Father speaks out against Asbury Park crime
Friday Night Football - Championships 3 Friday Night Football: Championships
Anti-bear hunt supporters gathered at Andover Municipal Court 4 Bear hunt protester to serve 10-day jail sentence
VIDEO: Man reunited with missing wedding ring 5 VIDEO: Man reunited with missing wedding ring

advertisement | advertise on News 12

Features

It's good to know you have Walt Kane Kane in Your Corner

It's good to know you have Walt Kane in your corner.

News 12 takes a look at the hottest Tech Check

Eric Landskroner has a look at the latest gadgets and biggest stories in tech.

News 12 On the Scene

Check out these exclusive videos from New Jersey celebs!

Sorry to interrupt...

Your first 5 are free

Access to News12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Time Warner® and Service Electric℠ video customers.

Please enjoy 5 complimentary views to articles, photos, and videos during the next 30 days.

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE